Da Form 3034

The United States Army requires that all food production schedules take into account risk management. There are a number of factors that need to be considered when creating a schedule, and proper procedures must be followed in order to ensure the safety of those consuming the food.

One of the most important factors to consider when creating a food production schedule is the possibility of contamination. All food must be properly cooked and stored in order to prevent the spread of disease. Cross-contamination can occur at any stage of production, so it is important to have strict protocols in place to avoid it.

Another important factor to consider is the shelf life of the food. All products must be given a expiration date, and it is important to stick to that date. If food is not consumed within the proper time frame, it can pose a health risk.

The United States Army Food Program has their own specific way of handling and preparing documents that is AR 30-22 compliant. There is an extensive guide on the correct procedures in the Department of the Army Pamphlet (DA PAM) 30-22, which covers Operating Procedures for the Army Food Program.

This pamphlet applies to the Active Army, the Army National Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve.

AR 30-22, The Army Food Program outlines the procedures for requisitioning, receiving, storing, issuing, and accounting for subsistence items. This regulation applies to all commanders, food advisers, activity food service managers (FSM), dietitians, and other personnel who have responsibility for any part of the Army food program.

DA PAM 30-22, Operating Procedures for the Army Food Program providesstep-by-step procedures on how to requisition, receive, store, issue, and account for subsistence items. This pamphlet is a supplement to AR 30-22 and should be used in conjunction with that regulation.

The purpose of this pamphlet is to provide detailed information and procedures on how to correctly requisition, receive, store, issue, and account for subsistence items. This pamphlet will also help food service personnel to understand the proper way to fill out documents associated with the Army food program.

This pamphlet applies to all Army food service personnel who have responsibility for any part of the Army food program. This includes, but is not limited to, Active Army, Army National Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and U.S. Army Reserve personnel.

A Production Schedule is a form that outlines the specific meals to be prepared for a meal. A separate completed Production schedule and set of Risk Data Management Logs will be required for each day’s supper. Despite the size, type, or climate in which they are produced, production schedules will always be created.

1. All products that are to be prepared will be listed by name and quantity on the Production Schedule.

2. The planned cook time, total estimated time to complete the product, and the actual cook time will also be included on the Production Schedule.

3. After listing all of the required information for each product, the “Total Estimated Completion Time” for all of the products will be calculated. This is the estimated time that it will take to complete all of the products on the Production Schedule.

4. The “Actual Cook Time” for each product will be recorded after completion. This is the actual amount of time it took to prepare the product from start to finish.

5. The “Yield” for each product will be listed on the Production Schedule. This is the number of servings that the product will yield.

6. The “Leftovers” for each product will also be listed on the Production Schedule. This is the number of servings of the product that will be left over after all of the planned meals have been served.

7. The “Waste” for each product will be calculated and recorded on the Production Schedule. This is the amount of product that was wasted during preparation or that was not fit for human consumption.

8. The “Usable Product” for each item will be calculated and recorded on the Production Schedule. This is the amount of product that is fit for human consumption and that will be used to feed the troops.

9. The “Percent Yield” for each product will be calculated and recorded on the Production Schedule. This is the percentage of the product that was not wasted and that is fit for human consumption.

10. The “Production Schedule” will be signed by the person in charge of food preparation and by the person in charge of food service.

11. The “Production Schedule” will be reviewed daily by the person in charge of food preparation and by the person in charge of food service.

12. Any changes to the “Production Schedule” will be made by the person in charge of food preparation and will be approved by the person in charge of food service.

The DA 3034 is for cook personnel and it should be easy to understand. There are 16 data categories, or columns in the Production Schedule part of the form. Columns 1 through 6 have information on the meal like the date, time, unitserved and projected headcount.

The next six columns, 7 through 12, list the menu number for the meal and the quantities of each food item required to produce that menu. The last four columns on the form, 13 through 16, are for remarks pertaining to the meal. This is where information such as holiday meals or other special circumstances will be annotated.

When creating a production schedule it’s important to remember a few key points:

-Schedule should be created 14 days in advance

-Schedule must be reviewed and updated at least once a week and as needed

-Changes to the schedule must be approved by the Garrison Commander or their designee

-The production schedule is a living document and changes will happen, be flexible

Assigned products, projected start times, recipe numbers and portions are found in columns 7 through 14. After the meal, column 12 would be filled out by the shift leader with information on how many servings were prepared and served during that particular meal while column 13 noted any leftover or waste product.

This is important information to keep track of so that the next day’s meal can be planned more accurately. In column 20, the shift leader would also document any customer complaints about the food and how they were handled.

The United States Army requires all food service personnel to adhere to proper procedures for production schedules and risk management in order to maintain a high standard of quality control. When preparing meals, accurate planning is essential in order to avoid potential waste and ensure that all products are properly cooked and safe to consume.

Furthermore, it is important to have a system in place for documenting customer complaints and taking corrective action as necessary. By following these guidelines, army food service personnel can ensure that every meal meets the high standards expected by the military.

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