Theory Paper Example

“Erik Erickson’s idea of Psychosocial Development is one of the most well-known theories of personality in psychology,” says Cherry (2010), (Psychosocial Development in Infancy and Early Childhood, para 2). Farzaneh (2008), “Erickson’s Psychosocial Theory focuses on how society influences and shapes a person’s developing sense of ego.”

Erikson’s Psychosocial Theory is based on eight stages of development. These stages are: 1) Trust vs. Mistrust, 2) Autonomy vs. Shame and Doubt, 3) Initiative vs. Guilt, 4) Industry vs. Inferiority, 5) Identity vs. Role Confusion, 6) Intimacy vs. Isolation, 7) Generativity vs. Stagnation, and 8) Ego Integrity vs. Despair (Cherry, 2010).

During the first stage of Trust vs. Mistrust, infants learn to trust or mistrust others based on the care they receive from their primary caregivers. If infants are given love and attention, they learn to trust others. If they are neglected or abused, they learn to mistrust others.

The second stage of Autonomy vs. Shame and Doubt occurs during toddlerhood. Children at this age begin to assert their independence and learn to do things on their own. If parents are too overprotective or infantile, children may develop shame and doubt.

The third stage of Initiative vs. Guilt occurs during early childhood. Children at this age begin to take initiative and explore their environment. If parents are too overbearing or restrictive, children may develop guilt.

The fourth stage of Industry vs. Inferiority occurs during middle childhood. Children at this age are beginning to learn new skills and master new tasks. If they feel inadequate or unsuccessful, they may develop a sense of inferiority.

The fifth stage of Identity vs. Role Confusion occurs during adolescence. Adolescents are exploring their identity and trying to figure out who they are and where they fit in the world. If they feel confused or uncertain about their identity, they may experience role confusion.

The sixth stage of Intimacy vs. Isolation occurs during young adulthood. Young adults at this stage are seeking intimate relationships with others. If they feel isolated or alone, they may develop feelings of loneliness and desperation.

The seventh stage of Generativity vs. Stagnation occurs during middle adulthood. Middle-aged adults at this stage are typically focused on work and family. If they feel like they are not contributing to society or their family, they may experience stagnation.

The eighth and final stage of Ego Integrity vs. Despair occurs during late adulthood. Older adults at this stage reflect on their life and assess whether it was meaningful and satisfying. If they feel like their life was not worthwhile, they may experience despair.

Erikson’s Psychosocial Theory is a useful tool for understanding human development. It can help us to understand why people behave the way they do at different stages of their lives. It can also help us to understand how our early experiences shape our later development.

According to Erickson, society is a positive force that helps people grow and develop. Each stage represents a crisis in the form of gradually increasing conflicts (The Different Conflicts and Stages of Life, para 8). These conflicts must be resolved so that the person can mature. If they are dealt with successfully, the individual will move on to the next stage feeling competent and confident.

Erik Erikson’s psychosocial theory of development emphasizes the sociocultural influences on human growth and development. Erik Erikson was a German-born American developmental psychologist and psychoanalyst known for his theory on psychological development of human beings. He may be most famous for coining the phrase “identity crisis.”

Erik Erikson believed that we develop in stages. These stages are biological as well as psychological and they occur in a predetermined order. Each stage builds upon the successful completion of earlier stages. The challenges of each stage must be met before moving on to the next stage (Erik Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development, 2013). Erik Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development has eight distinct stages, as opposed to Sigmund Freud’s five.

When the ego develops in an unhealthy manner, it can lead to mental disorders and maladjustments. Psychosocial theory focuses on human development throughout one’s lifetime, from birth to death. This paper will explain how the Psychosocial Development Theory has affected my view of people in society and at work, as well as my interactions with others, following a review of its applications to society and business.

Erik Erikson’s Psychosocial Developmental Theory Erik Erikson was a Neo-Freudian psychoanalyst who developed the Psychosocial Developmental Theory. The theory contains eight distinct stages that are spread out over the lifespan from birth to death.

Ego identity vs. role confusion is the fifth stage of Erik Erikson’s Psychosocial Developmental Theory. This stage usually occurs during adolescence between the ages of 12 to 18 years old.

During this stage, individuals are exploring and trying to figure out who they are as individuals separate from their family unit. It is important for individuals to develop a sense of self so that they can become independent adults (Santrock, 2013). If individuals do not develop a sense of self during this stage, they may experience role confusion in adulthood.

I believe that the Psychosocial Developmental Theory helps to explain the personalities and behaviors of people in society and the workplace. For example, if someone is experiencing role confusion in their job, they may have difficulty performing tasks or they may feel lost. If someone has developed a strong sense of ego identity, they may be more likely to succeed in their job because they know who they are as an individual separate from their job.

Additionally, the Psychosocial Developmental Theory can help to explain why some people are more successful than others in the workplace. For example, if someone has developed a strong sense of ego identity, they may be more likely to be successful in their job because they know who they are as an individual separate from their job.

The Psychosocial Developmental Theory also influences my role in society and workplace. For example, if I am working with someone who is experiencing role confusion, I can help them to explore their identity and figure out who they are as an individual separate from their job. Additionally, if I am working with someone who has developed a strong sense of ego identity, I can help them to maintain their sense of self and to be successful in their job.

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